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9 Tips for Preventing Shaving Irritation

Tired of razor burns and shaving irritation? If you’re stuck in an endless cycle of shave, burn, repeat then keep on reading to learn our top 9 tips for preventing shaving irritation.


Here are the tips you will learn more about in this post:


Time to recover

Trim first

Hot start

Find the right soap for you

Stay sharp

Once is often enough

Gently does It

All about the angles

After-shave routine



Man With Razor Burn
Learn How To Prevent Razor Burn


If you consider razor burns to be an inevitable, yet painful part of life or smooth shaving feels like a distant dream, then it’s time you learned a thing or 9 about how to prevent shaving irritation. Nothing feels worse than turning fiery red after shaving your face. Every shave, you aspire towards a smooth and comfortable finish, like the man on the advert so convincingly promised. Yet, the razor seems to punish your skin. Every. Single. Time. To make matters worse, by the time the razor burn heals, new stubble will already be growing.


Sound familiar? We’ve all been there. If you’re stuck in this endless cycle of shave, burn, repeat then keep on reading to learn our top 9 tips for preventing shaving irritation.


If your razor burn is worse immediately after you shave, make sure that you give it time to recover

1. Time to recover


Skin irritation can be worsened by poor shaving techniques, and if there's one thing that makes your shaving technique poor, it's rushing. Fast and repetitive strokes of your shaver will irritate your skin. Take a more cautious approach by slowing it down and your skin will thank you.


If your razor burn is worse immediately after you shave, make sure that you give it time to recover before you head out to a big date or business meeting. We recommend that you shave at least two hours before you need to head out to allow your skin to calm down and breathe a little.


2. Trim first


Trying to shave when you have some longer hairs can be very painful, so you should be sure to. trim those longer hairs before starting the process. This prevents longer hairs from getting trapped under your razor blade and pulling harshly on your skin. An added benefit is that your blade also stays sharper for longer.


This attention to detail can help reduce the chances of ingrown hairs popping up. Check out your common problem areas for longer hairs and trim them down. If you’re going for a shaped and groomed look, trim any facial hair that you’re keeping (like sideburns and your moustache) before shaving rather than afterwards so that you’re not kicking your skin while it’s down.


3. Hot start


Soften your skin before shaving by applying plenty of hot water to it. A hot shower is an effective way to do this because you need more than a splash of warm water to achieve successful results.


Traditional barbers have used hot towels for centuries. It's an effective way of applying warmth to the skin and preparing the beard for the razor. If you’re not in a hurry, pour hot water on to a small towel or washcloth and wring out the excess water. Place the towel or washcloth on to your face and leave it there for a few minutes. Repeat this several times until your face is warmed and softened.


Hot water opens up your pores and loosens up the whiskers and makes each sweep of your blade more effective.


Not all shaving soaps, foams, gels, and creams are created equal.

4. Find the right soap for you


Not all shaving soaps, foams, gels, and creams are created equal. Experiment with them until you find one that works for you and your skin type. Make sure that you pay close attention to the ingredients list, harsh chemicals can be hiding in plain sight.


Natural shaving soap can be more effective and less irritating for your skin. A soap can provide superior lubrication between your razor and your skin, reducing irritation.


5. Stay sharp


A blunt razor will be much more irritating to your skin than a sharp one. The sharp blade will pass over the skin surface while a blunt blade can be uneven and scratch your skin. A sharp razor will need fewer passes across the surface of the skin to cut the facial hairs, meaning less scraping of the skin and less irritation.


If you use a razor with cartridges or a disposable razor, make sure that you replace them frequently.


6. Once is often enough


One cause of skin irritation is repeatedly passing a razor blade over the same spot of skin. Razors that are made up of two, three or even four blades make matters even worse. They scrape the surface of your facial skin many times, with little effect or purpose.


One pass across your face is enough if you prepare your skin properly and have a sharp razor blade. If your skin is irritated by shaving, only shave when you really have to and stray away from multi-bladed razors.


If you have to make a second pass lather up again and don't go in the same direction. Any stray beard hairs are more likely to be caught if you change the direction. Don't shave against the grain but instead, go sideways for a second pass.


Don't insist on a close shave. A little facial ruggedness looks fine and it's better than the soreness of that razor rash look.

7. Gently does It


Part of the cause of skin irritation is friction between your razor and your face, which is increased the harder you press on to your skin. If you reduce the pressure, you'll reduce the friction and the irritation.


Be kind and gentle to your face. Don't insist on a close shave. A little facial ruggedness looks fine and it's better than the soreness of that razor rash look.


Better to have a "good enough" shave and allow your face to heal properly than to insist on the ultimate shave. You can promote healing and inflict less damage by shaving less frequently or just at night.


8. All about the angles


Some hard-to-reach areas of your face could be encouraging you to increase the number of passes. Study your face and identify any problematic areas.


Do you struggle to achieve a clean shave around your Adam's apple or under your chin? Try approaching these areas from a different angle. A sideways pass rather than a downward one might do the trick.


Manipulate the skin in these areas to improve your razor's access to uncooperating hairs. Encourage the hairs to stand up by stretching the skin. That way you'll shave the stragglers more effectively.


Some natural cooling remedies can also help. Try tea tree oil or witch hazel extract. Apply them to your face directly or with a cold compress.

9. After-shave routine


After enforcing all these helpful shaving practices, you could still have some irritation. It isn’t always completely inescapable. Luckily, razor burn can be treated to prevent it from developing or to reverse the symptoms.


Keep your fingers away from the affected area. Touching the irritated skin can make it worse and even pass infections from your fingers to your face. Better to apply a cool compress or wet cloth to reduce the inflammation.


Some natural cooling remedies can also help. Try tea tree oil or witch hazel extract. Apply them to your face directly or with a cold compress. These are natural cooling treatments that also help to reduce infection. Coconut oil, avocado oil, or even olive oil can reduce itching and burning sensations. Aftershave balm and moisturisers can also be extremely helpful and kind to your skin.


We’ve got your back


Shaveman’s knows that shaving can sometimes feel like a chore. If you suffer from shaving irritation it can be incredibly painful and ruin your shaving experience for good. We recommend that you transform the whole experience into a self-care activity so that you feel good about the skin you’re in and get better results too. Take a look at our line of shaving products to explore how we can help.

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